Skip to main content

Autism Night Before Christmas


This poem was written in 2008 by Cindy Waeltermann, who is the founder of the organization Autism LinkI just discovered it today on facebook...Though many of you might like it...



Twas the Night Before Christmas
And all through the house
The creatures were stirring
Yes, even the mouse

We tried melatonin

And gave a hot bath
But the holiday jitters
They always distract

The children were finally

All nestled in bed
When nightmares of terror
Ran through my OWN head

Did I get the right gift

The right color
And style
Would there be a tantrum
Or even, maybe, a smile?

Our relatives come

But they don't understand
The pleasure she gets
Just from flapping her hands.

“They need discipline,” they say

“Just a well-needed smack,
You must learn to parent…”
And on goes the attack

We smile and nod

Because we know deep inside
The argument is moot
Let them all take a side

We know what it’s like

To live with the spectrum
The struggles and triumphs
Achievements, regressions…

But what they don’t know

And what they don't see
Is the joy that we feel
Over simplicity

He said “hello”

She ate something green!
He told his first lie!
She did not cause a scene!

He peed on the potty

Who cares if he’s ten,
She stopped saying the same thing
Again and again!

Others don’t realize

Just how we can cope
How we bravely hang on
At the end of our rope

But what they don’t see

Is the joy we can’t hide
When our children with autism
Make the tiniest stride

We may look at others

Without the problems we face
With jealousy, hatred
Or even distaste,

But what they don’t know

Nor sometimes do we
Is that children with autism
Bring simplicity.

We don't get excited

Over expensive things
We jump for joy
With the progress work brings

Children with autism

Try hard every day
That they make us proud
More than words can say.

They work even harder

Than you or I
To achieve something small
To reach a star in the sky

So to those who don't get it

Or can’t get a clue
Take a walk in my shoes
And I'll assure you

That even 10 minutes

Into the walk
You'll look at me
With respect, even shock.

You will realize

What it is I go through
And the next time you judge
I can assure you

That you won’t say a thing

You’ll be quiet and learn,
Like the years that I did
When the tables were turned……























































































Popular posts from this blog

When It's More Than Just Squirrels.

Hulk was a very lively baby, who hated to sleep alone. As he grew, he found a love for drawing. We would find his creations everywhere. On the walls, furniture, doors, and on any paper he could find. He has an amazing ability! He also has some uniquenesses. He loves dressing-up and being different characters, sometimes I think he'd rather be them than himself.  Hulk has sensory processing disorder. The food on his plate can't touch. He occasionally has poor eye contact. Some noises, materials, and smells bother him.  I noticed these things around the same time Tink was diagnosed with ASD, so of course the thought was in the back of my head. Once you have one child on the spectrum, you get this radar for other kids.  Hulk started school, Kindergarten, First grade went well. Except at home he was very hyperactive, impulsive, and couldn't focus. He was diagnosed with ADHD. By the end of First grade he was falling behind in reading and his teacher was concerned. In second grade…

Before you judge, understand why.

I really wish there were no judgmental people in this world, but there are.  Autism is a condition which is difficult for many to understand and, once again, our family has experienced ignorance. This post is to all of the people that have seen and judged my daughter lately - a six year old child sitting in a jogging stroller whining and crying, yelling and screaming, kicking her feet, repeatedly pulling the visor down and demanding things. This is what YOU see. You might think "What a spoiled brat!" or "She's too big for that stroller." She isn't doing it to get her way. This is Autism. Let me explain... She rides in a stroller because it's the safest place for her. Crowded, fast-paced and noisy environments cause her anxiety, which triggers a sensory overload and she tries to flee. She also has Joint Hypermobilty Syndromethat makes her to become very tired and causes pain in her joints. Although she tries very hard to conform anywhere she is some days ar…

Preparing for the future

For the past week I have been trying to keep my mind off the results of Doc's evaluation, still waiting for the phone call.      I have been working on some ideas for the new sensory/therapy room. Sensory bins are wonderful hands on fun for many ages including toddlers and preschoolers! Many skills can be learned and explored through sensory bin play including social and emotional communication, literacy, fine motor skills, and more! Sensory bins provide an outlet for children to engage in a meaningful way and also receive sensory input that their little minds and bodies crave.     Exploring through touch and feel can be a positive experience for most children. Sensory input from sensory bins works with your child's nervous system. Some fillers may be preferable to others, so don't give up trying! Let your child be your guide! Use a sensory bin to talk with your child about what he or she is sensing! Great communication and self-awareness activity. What do you see? How does …