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Why is playing so hard?

Sorry it's been a while since I did a blog entry. On Jan 14th of this year, Doc was officially diagnosed ASD level 1 (equivalent of what they used to call Asperger's). She was evaluated for speech (social) and Early Intervention, but neither of them saw anything at the time. These evals are done one-on-one with an adult in a quiet room. She works well in this situation and will mask her ASD quite well. She did receive PT for Hypermobility Syndrome for a few months. We have been working on getting a case manager and a BHP in place for home.

Tonight during wrestling practice for our boys I saw a glimpse of how hard socializing is for Doc with her peers. There were two little girls a little older than Doc. All three were playing, running around. "Let's all do this! Ok, now we're going to do this." Doc tends to come off as bossy and rude. The girls followed her "rules" till they had had enough and walked off together leaving Doc alone. There were plenty of social cues that they were getting bored and annoyed, but Doc missed them. It was heart breaking to watch. She shut down and began to pout for 10 mins on the edge of the mat. By the time we got her off the mat with the help of Mr. Magnificent, she was in a full blown meltdown and unresponsive. We left wrestling practice early with a shoeless confused little girl. I'm dreading Kindergarten. 

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